It would appear that my program designed to predict emotional responses needs… adjustment.

(Source: kirknspock)

(Reblogged from startrekgifs)

odditiesoflife:

The Most Intense Color of Any Living Thing on Earth

Also known as the marble berry, Pollia condensata is a wild plant that grows in the forests of several African countries. The berries are not edible, but they have an extremely rare property. They produce the most intense color of any living thing on Earth. Even after the berries have been picked from the plant, they stay the same shiny, vibrant, metallic blue color for many decades.

The vast majority of colors in the biological world are produced by pigments—compounds produced by a living organism that selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light, so that they appear to be the color of whichever wavelengths they reflect.

However, the marble berry’s skin has no pigment. The berries produce their vibrant blue color through nanoscale-sized cellulose strands that scatter light as they interact with one another. Thus the fruit’s color is even visible at the cellular level as pictured above.

(Source: blogs.smithsonianmag.com)

(Reblogged from ohscience)

scanzen:

Control roomText on the left side monitor: NASA Lewis Research Center 9X15 LOW SPEED WIND TUNNEL. 11:19:28 3/6/1989

Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center via archive.org

(Reblogged from freshphotons)

prostheticknowledge:

A Table where Little People Live

Interactive furniture for children from teamLab is a wide round table with many projected little characters navigate around the objects you place on it - video embedded below:

This is a table where little people live. The little people run around and do not notice us, but place your hand or an object on the table and the people will notice and jump onto it. The action of the little people changes in response to the shape and color of the object placed on the table. The more objects that are placed on the table, the more the little people’s world comes to life and they play with delight.

You can find out more about the project at teamLab’s website here

(It is also part of Tokyo Designers week at Milano - more info here)

(Reblogged from prostheticknowledge)
(Reblogged from ohscience)

jtotheizzoe:

This pi may be old, but it’s still delicious.  

Gah, I love vintage Coronet Instructional Films. You can watch the whole Coronet archive here, for free!

via okkultmotionpictures:

Happy OKKULT Pi Day


EXCERPTS >|< Meaning Of Pi (1949)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: A/V Geek Film Archive
 | Download: Ogg | h.264 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: Public Domain Mark 1.0

A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Meaning of Pi (1949). The video Explains how pi denotes the ratio of a circle to its diameter, shows the use of circles in art, industry and commerce, outlines a procedure by which the numerical value of pi can be checked and reviewed, and describes the discovery and importance of pi.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE


Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from open source/unknown/rare/controversial moving images.
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<

(Reblogged from freshphotons)

scienceisbeauty:

Isosurface of Q-criterion colored by vorticity showing rotor wake from a ROBIN body.

Source&credit: Rotor Wake from a ROBIN BodyCD-adapco

(You will find out fascinating stuff in their site, I have to say)

(Reblogged from freshphotons)

acting-captains-log:

Happy 83rd Birthday to William Shatner & Leonard Nimoy !
(Reblogged from startrekgifs)
proofmathisbeautiful:

How “Groundbreaking” number crunching found path of Flight 370
Via CNN — Monday’s announcement by Malaysia’s Prime Minister acknowledging that missing Flight 370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean opens the door to a big question: How did new number crunching confirm the Boeing 777’s path?
Now we know for sure “there’s no way it went north,” said Inmarsat Senior Vice President Chris McLaughlin.
Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday that the plane was last tracked over the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth, Australia. Malaysian Airlines has informed passengers’ relatives that “all lives are lost,” a relative told CNN.
Monday’s announcement brings new questions about the mystery that has captivated the planet for more than two weeks. It also provoked a call that all airliners be constantly tracked.
The mathematics-based process used by Inmarsat and the UK’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) to reveal the definitive path was described by McLaughlin as “groundbreaking.”
"We’ve done something new," he said.
Here’s how the process works in a nutshell: Inmarsat officials and engineers were able to determine whether the plane was flying away or toward the satellite’s location by expansion or compression of the satellite’s signal.
What does expansion or compression mean? You may have heard about something called the Doppler effect.
"If you sit at a train station and you listen to the train whistle — the pitch of the whistle changes as it moves past. That’s exactly what we have," explained CNN Meteorologist Chad Myers,who has studied Doppler technology. "It’s the Doppler effect that they’re using on this ping or handshake back from the airplane. They know by nanoseconds whether that signal was compressed a little — or expanded — by whether the plane was moving closer or away from 64.5 degrees — which is the latitude of the orbiting satellite."
Each ping was analyzed for its direction of travel, Myers said. The new calculations, McLaughlin said, underwent a peer review process with space agency experts and contributions by Boeing.
It’s possible to use this analysis to determine more specifically the area where the plane went down, Myers said. “Using trigonometry, engineers are capable of finding angles of flight.”

proofmathisbeautiful:

How “Groundbreaking” number crunching found path of Flight 370

Via CNN — Monday’s announcement by Malaysia’s Prime Minister acknowledging that missing Flight 370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean opens the door to a big question: How did new number crunching confirm the Boeing 777’s path?

Now we know for sure “there’s no way it went north,” said Inmarsat Senior Vice President Chris McLaughlin.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday that the plane was last tracked over the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth, Australia. Malaysian Airlines has informed passengers’ relatives that “all lives are lost,” a relative told CNN.

Monday’s announcement brings new questions about the mystery that has captivated the planet for more than two weeks. It also provoked a call that all airliners be constantly tracked.

The mathematics-based process used by Inmarsat and the UK’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) to reveal the definitive path was described by McLaughlin as “groundbreaking.”

"We’ve done something new," he said.

Here’s how the process works in a nutshell: Inmarsat officials and engineers were able to determine whether the plane was flying away or toward the satellite’s location by expansion or compression of the satellite’s signal.

What does expansion or compression mean? You may have heard about something called the Doppler effect.

"If you sit at a train station and you listen to the train whistle — the pitch of the whistle changes as it moves past. That’s exactly what we have," explained CNN Meteorologist Chad Myers,who has studied Doppler technology. "It’s the Doppler effect that they’re using on this ping or handshake back from the airplane. They know by nanoseconds whether that signal was compressed a little — or expanded — by whether the plane was moving closer or away from 64.5 degrees — which is the latitude of the orbiting satellite."

Each ping was analyzed for its direction of travel, Myers said. The new calculations, McLaughlin said, underwent a peer review process with space agency experts and contributions by Boeing.

It’s possible to use this analysis to determine more specifically the area where the plane went down, Myers said. “Using trigonometry, engineers are capable of finding angles of flight.”

(Reblogged from proofmathisbeautiful)

boldlygiffing:

Season 1 - Episode 23 “Skin of Evil”

(Reblogged from startrekgifs)